Category: Autonomous Driving

Autoware workshop @ Intelligent Vehicles Symposium 2019

IV2019 brings together researchers and practitioners from universities, industry and government agencies worldwide to share and discuss the latest advances in theory and technology related to intelligent vehicles.

The Autoware foundation is hosting a workshop on Sunday 9th June 2019, with the aim of discussing the current state of development of Autoware AI and Autoware Auto, and considering various technical directions that the Foundation is looking to pursue. Parkopedia’s contribution is around maps and specifically, the integration of indoor maps for Autonomous Valet Parking.

Parkopedia’s Angelo Mastroberardino will be presenting our work on maps, answering questions like “Why do we need these maps?”, “How do we represent geometry and road markings within maps?”, and naturally leading towards the question of how we use these maps for path planning within indoor car parks.

Later, Dr Brian Holt will be joining Tier 4, Apex.AI, Open Robotics, TRI-AD, and Intel on a panel to discuss Autoware and its impact on autonomous driving.

Parkopedia joined the Autoware Foundation as a premium founding member, because we believe in open source as a force multiplier to build amazing software. We are contributing maps, including for the AutonomouStuff car park in San Jose, USA, which you can download for use with your own self-driving car in simulation. Find out more

First Autonomous Test

We successfully completed our first tests at Turweston Aerodrome last week.

Unloading the StreetDrone.ONE

The plan was to check and ensure the robustness of the drive-by-wire system, to train our safety drivers and to do basic path following.

We also took the opportunity to collect some data from the ultrasonic sensors that are on the StreetDrone.ONE which we will use for system safety.

Ultrasonic data collection
Drive-by-wire testing

For testing the drive-by-wire system, we carried out a number of test runs using teleoperation from the driver. We drove on the track forward, backward and changing steering at various speeds. The system performed satisfactorily. We also performed a full brake test to work out a safe driving speed and stopping distance in a case of emergency stop. Further details are presented in this blog post.

Path following with PID feedback control and a basic GPS and IMU localisation

On the final day, we tested a basic path following to make sure everything worked together. We integrated the drive-by-wire (dbw) system with a path follower, PID motion controller and a basic gps and imu localisation in this open space environment.

We managed to achieve the objective of testing the dbw with the feedback control for the path following. However, precision was not there as we expected. The basic imu and gps sensor localisation would not give very accurate positioning and tends to drift away or jump around to within 5m accuracy. To resolve this issue, we are working on a better localisation using RTK GPS (like a simpleRTK2B) using RTK corrections over NTRIP.

Our next test will focus on path following using the high quality localisation and we also hope to start with path planning within the open space. More updates will follow!